ServiceMax promises accelerating growth as key to $1.4B SPAC deal

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ServiceMax, a company that builds software for the field-service industry, announced yesterday that it will go public via a special purpose acquisition company, or SPAC in a deal valued at $1.4 billion. The transaction comes after ServiceMax was sold to GE for $915 million in 2016, before being spun out in late 2018. The company most recently raised $80 million from Salesforce Ventures, a key partner.

ServiceMax competes in the growing field service industry primarily with ServiceNow, and interestingly enough given Salesforce Ventures’ recent investment, Salesforce Service Cloud. Other large enterprise vendors like Microsoft, SAP and Oracle also have similar products. The market looks at helping digitize traditional field service, but also touches on in-house service like IT and HR giving it a broader market in which to play.

GE originally bought the company as part of a growing industrial Internet of Things (IoT) strategy at the time, hoping to have a software service that could work hand-in-glove with the automated machine maintenance it was looking to implement. When that strategy failed to materialize, the company spun out ServiceMax and until now it remained part of Silver Lake Partners thanks to a deal deal that was finalized in 2019.

TechCrunch was curious why that was the case, so we dug into the company’s investor presentation for more hints about its financial performance. Broadly, ServiceMax’s business has a history of modest growth and cash consumption. It promises a big change to that storyline, though. Here’s how.

A look at the data

The company’s pitch to investors is that with new capital it can accelerate its growth rate and begin to generate free cash flow. To get there, the company will pursue organic (in-house) and inorganic (acquisition-based) growth. The company’s blank-check combination will provide what the company described as “$335 million of gross proceeds,” a hefty sum for the company compared to its most recent funding round.



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Kylie Knox

Kylie Knox

Kylie Knox is our lead analyst for Electronics Product reviews. She studied at RPI and worked on the retail side of the industry at B&H before landing at Topgadgethut. Also, she handled all of Good Housekeeping’s nutrition-related content, testing, and evaluation from 2017 to 2019.

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A registered dietitian with a Bachelor of Arts degree from Loyola University and a Master of Science degree in Clinical Nutrition from Columbia University, Kylie Knox handled all of Good Housekeeping’s nutrition-related content, testing, and evaluation from 2017 to 2020.

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